The Five Songs I Have on Repeat the Most According to Spotify

Whew, it’s been a long time since I’ve done a music-based blog post, despite listening to music virtually every day. I’ve been meaning to let you all in on what I’ve been listening to lately, and this Tweet above from Spotify inspired me to share.

I’m not sure what counts as a repeat listen or how Spotify curated this, and even what the time period is for this is (I assume recently because the songs on my full list are recent ones), but according to Spotify at least, these are the top five songs I’ve been listening to the most lately:

1. “Little Bit Of Rain,” by Karen Dalton

I can see this song being a repeat. Karen Dalton’s song here is one of those songs I discovered by randomly browsing the aptly named feature on Spotify, “Discover.” Her voice hits the right spot for me, that’s what it really comes down to. I love that sort of Janis Joplin (although not as scratchy) old-timey feel to her voice. Like when describing beer, I’m awful at describing vocals, but that’s what her voice reminds me of at least.

2. “Atonement” by Lucinda Williams.

Like above, I discovered this song through the “Discover” tab, and it stopped me in tracks. That opening bit just makes me want to curl my lip and get my feet a-stompin’. It’s cool, and then when Lucinda comes in with, “Come on, come, come on,” I’m all in. It’s a nice blend of rock with folk. I’m surprised this song is on here and not her other one, though. Her other one, “Fruits Of My Labor,” I actually like a tad bit more because it’s slower, folksier and has that great Thom Yorke quality to it (I associate that with a sort of … not whiny, but singing with pain, for lack of a better word). As a bonus, here’s that one:


3. “The Spinning Wheel” by Cotton Jones.

This song reminds me of something I would hear from Damien Jurado. It’s raw, without some of that production polish (that’s not a diss, as I very much like that), and it feels like a singer-songwriter in his basement just belting out his pain. If you’ve not noticed the theme yet, this song is also slow, somber and with vocals that pull me right in.

4. “Wolves” by Phosphorescent

The entire album this comes from, 2007’s Pride, is fantastic, but in particular, I’m stuck on this song, “Wolves.” In fact, with how often I was listening to it a few months ago, I’m surprised it’s not the first one on this list. Again, it reminds me of something I would listen to from Radiohead and Yorke. The way Matthew Houck, lead singer, sings this one makes me want to cry, and emote. It’s beautiful and stunning. Plus, the deeper meaning of the song lyrics are potent. Honestly, when I think about depression, I think about this song. It has that connection for me.

5. “Baby Britain” by Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield

See, it’s not all somber and morose. Well, it still sort of is, but not compared to the previous entries in the top five. For me, this is a “fun” song, as it’s a bit more upbeat, and a nice change of pace if I am listening to a lot of dark songs in a row. I particularly like when Jessica Lea Mayfield’s part of the duet/song kicks in. Her voice soars for me, and adds a lot to the duet. I have two other songs from that album on one of my makeshift playlists, “Fond Farewell,” “Ballad of Big Nothing,” and “Between the Bars.” Which, again, sort of like Lucinda Williams, while I like the song on the “On Repeat” playlist from Spotify, I actually prefer “Ballad of Big Nothing,” the most out of that bunch.

If you use Spotify to listen to a lot of music, like I do, what are the top five repeat songs on your list? I’m always down for recommendations, and please, don’t let the sad songs fool you, I’m open to more upbeat songs, too!

 

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